Success Stories

Your support of the Conservancy’s work puts you at the center of critical conservation projects underway around the globe and close to home. Find out how you are making a difference for our natural world.

Restoring America’s Heartland Takes Heart

Photo
Photo

Nature is resilient. But sometimes it needs a helping hand. Meet some amazing people who are helping The Nature Conservancy restore a river’s floodplain in Wisconsin, bring bison back to the Great Plains, save the black-footed ferret in South Dakota and work other small miracles for nature in America’s Heartland.

Meet These Heartland Heros »

Tags on this post
Member Updates

The Fish Are on Their Way Upstream

Photo
Photo Mark Godfrey/TNC

The Nature Conservancy recently coordinated a project at Florida’s Jim Woodruff Lock and Dam that is allowing fish to migrate upstream to native spawning grounds. At no additional operating cost, it may increase certain populations by up to five times. Find out how this regional effort has large-scale impacts for both people and nature. 

Using Science and Innovation to Restore Fish Populations »

Comments
Add your own comment »

I'm from Ecuador and I´m aquaculturists. It´s possible that you can tell me if an organization......
by JULISSA on May 21, 2010

View Full Comments »

Tags on this post
Freshwater

Jersey-sized Conservation in the Amazon

Photo
Photo Reinaldo Lourival

With the help of the Conservancy, a municipality the size of New Jersey and once known for being a top deforester has radically changed, in a short amount of of time, the way farmers and producers work.

Now, this municipality was officially declared as a model for forest conservation in 77 municipalities in the Amazon. Find out more to see how your support is making a difference.

Learn More and Watch a Slideshow »

Tags on this post
Rainforests, Member Updates

Heart of the Watershed

Photo
Photo Charlie Ott

The pristine Independence Lake, and the majestic wilderness that surrounds it, will remain protected from development following the sale of the lake and the land to The Nature Conservancy. This is a huge success for Nevada because Independence Lake provides a critical source of fresh water for their largest metropolitan area.

A Win for Nature, Fish and People »

Tags on this post
Freshwater, Forests

Green Thumbs in Guatemala

Photo
Photo Susan Ellis/TNC

In the heart of the Maya Forest, in a northern corner of Guatemala, lies the 500,000-acre Sierra del Lacandón National Park. It is here, in cooperation with Guatemala’s Ministry of Agriculture, the Conservancy has supported a pilot project to install backyard gardens, schoolyard gardens, chicken coops, greenhouses and apiaries to help local communities thrive.

How Does Small-Scale Farming Make a Difference? »

Tags on this post
International, Green Living

From Forest to Toilet Paper...and Back Again

Photo
Photo Limeydog via a Creative Commons license.

 Pedro is a tree planter helping to restore Brazil’s Atlantic Forest, which has been destroyed over centuries — for development, for ranching, for farming, and yes, for non-native eucalyptus plantations that in turn are regularly harvested to make rolls and rolls and rolls of pillowy, soft toilet paper.

Thanks to donors contributing a dollar per tree to The Nature Conservancy’s Plant a Billion Trees campaign to rebuild the Atlantic Forest, Pedro and his co-planters each put about 300 seedlings back in the ground every day during the planting season.

When Nature Calls... »

Educating with the Carbon Footprint Calculator

Photo
Photo 2002 Corbis

 Inevitably, in going about our daily lives — commuting, sheltering our families, eating — each of us contributes to the greenhouse gas emissions that are causing climate change. Yet, there are many things each of us, as individuals, can do to reduce our carbon emissions. The choices we make in our homes, our travel, the food we eat, and what we buy and throw away all influence our carbon footprint and can help ensure a stable climate for future generations.

Use The Nature Conservancy's carbon footprint calculator to measure your impact on our climate. Our carbon footprint calculator estimates how many tons of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases your choices create each year.

What's Your Carbon Footprint? »

Counting Rats from Space

Photo
Photo John Roser

The Nature Conservancy is working with University of California Berkeley researchers and partners at Carrizo Plain National Monument to count and map giant kangaroo rat populations using satellite remote sensing data.

Giant kangaroo rats are the keystone species of Carrizo Plain. A keystone species is like the centerstone in an arch — even though it’s one small stone, it keeps the whole thing standing up.

Why Bother? »

Comments
Add your own comment »

Rats incredible!!!...
by Shell on September 4, 2012

View Full Comments »

Tags on this post
Deserts, Member Updates, Science

Blueprint for Nature in China

Photo
Photo Ami Vitale

Your commitment to Conservancy science helps to support an enormous, sustainable construction project that will guide conservation in China for years to come. Check out the interactive map to see how your support is helping chart China's green future.

Explore the Map »

450,000 Acres Saved!

Photo
Photo Mark Godfrey/TNC

Fish River Station is a spectacular 450,000 acres in northern Australia and is home to species like wallabies and eagles. The Conservancy, in tandem with partners, worked to help the Indigenous Land Corporation purchase Fish River Station. Now we are working to place that land in the hands of Indigenous Australians who will sustainably manage it.

Discover One of the World’s Last Wildernesses »

Tags on this post
Grasslands, Rainforests

A Historic Win in Canada

Photo
Photo Charlie Ott

21 timber companies and nine conservation organizations, including The Nature Conservancy, have united in signing the Canadian Boreal Forest Agreement. This historic agreement is protecting 178 million acres of boreal forest in Canada. Unprecedented in scale, this agreement covers the largest amount of land ever involved in such conservation efforts.

How We Are Protecting This Forest of Riches »

Tags on this post
Forests

A Butterfly-Friendly Coastal Paradise

Photo
Photo Harold E. Malde

The Big Creek property acquisition in Oregon represents a giant step in protecting the Oregon silverspot butterfly, a threatened species that is only found in a handful of sites along the coast of Oregon and Northern California. This 193-acre property is vital for restoring the silverspot's habitat and in helping to connect other protected public lands.

Learn More About Our Butterfly Restoration Efforts »

Comments
Add your own comment »

I think this project is wonderful! Keep going!...
by Anna on November 4, 2010

View Full Comments »

Tags on this post
Oceans/Coasts

Coral Reefs May Save Your Life

Photo
Photo TNC

A coral reef may save your life one day.

Coral reefs offer us food, blunt storms and waves and bring in billions of dollars in recreation revenue. We now know that they also offer life-saving medicines. Why have we done so little to return the favor? 

The Huffington Post
Find Out How »

Comments
Add your own comment »

This is such an important topic. Thanks so much for sharing!...
by Green Leslie on July 6, 2011

View Full Comments »

Tags on this post
Coral Reefs, Oceans/Coasts

Old Laundry Facility Helps "Clean Up" the Adirondacks

Photo
Photo Carl Heilman II

Leave it to The Nature Conservancy to take an unwanted laundromat, donated by Blue Wolf Capital Fund II, L.P., and transform it into program support for New York state. The Conservancy will sell the property and use the profits to support the Heart of the Adirondacks project.

Learn more about this project and the home of New York state's most impressive array of plant and animal diversity.

Find Out How »

Comments
Add your own comment »

Re the photo on page 42 of the last issue of the magazine,showing a gorgeous tropical fish with a......
by Susan Prescott on June 13, 2011

View Full Comments »

One Little Bird Can Mean So Much

Photo
Photo Dave Currie

Kirtland’s warblers nearly became extinct in the 1970s. That’s why protecting these precious birds matters so deeply. Kirtland’s warblers rely on teams of dedicated conservationists who have not only compiled invaluable data on the tiny songbirds, but have put into action a plan that will help increase the birds’ population.

Learn More About the Kirtland’s Warbler »

Tags on this post
Birding

Putting a Price on Sharks

Photo
Photo New York Times' Green Blog

Reef sharks, as noted in an article on Monday about a new study, are worth more in the water than when sold for their fins and meat, at least in some cases.

New York Times' Green Blog
Can we prove that sharks are worth more in the water? »

A Struggle to Fight Back the Sea

Photo
Photo NPR

Some of the nation's richest and most important ecosystems lie where the ocean meets the land. It's these same coastal areas that are going to disappear as sea level continues to rise as a result of climate change.

NPR
See what scientists are doing to slow the inevitable »

Making Big Plans in China

Photo
Photo Ron Geatz/TNC

In China, The Nature Conservancy’s Conservation Blueprint is helping to support an enormous, sustainable construction project. The newly announced National Biodiversity Conservation Strategy and Action Plan demonstrates the central government’s efforts to build a greener China and highlights the positive impact that the Conservancy and its Blueprint are having on the country’s environmental future.

Floorplan for the Future »

Tags on this post
International

Sweet Success

Photo
Photo Peter Ellis/TNC

In Papua New Guinea, The Adelbert Conservation Cooperative Society, established with help from the Conservancy, recently started producing the first Fair Trade-certified cocoa in the country. With Fair Trade, consumers in countries outside Papua New Guinea will be able to make sustaining both forests and communities in the Adelberts possible.

How Is Fair Trade Cocoa Sustaining Conservation? »

Tags on this post
Forests

Keeping the Lands and Waters of Micronesia Safe

Photo
Photo Ami Vitale

Ant, a now-uninhabited atoll southwest of Pohnpei in the Federated States of Micronesia, is one of the best remaining seabird nesting islands. The Conservancy is working with Pohnpeians to restore the area’s environmental integrity and protect the rare tropical wildlife that depend on the atoll’s land and water for survival.

Read About Our Success Protecting Ant’s Precious Resources »

Tags on this post
Coral Reefs, Oceans/Coasts

Items 1 - 20 of 195  12345678910Next

Join Now -- It's Free!

You'll get green living tips, nature images, invitations and conservation news tailored to your interests!

Join Now

Already have a page? »

Send me my Login Information »

My Stories

RSS Feed

News Matching Your Interests

More Personalized Stories »

My Investments

RSS Feed

How Your Support is Helping

More Success Stories »
RSS Feed

Nature Conservancy Blogs

Headlines from the Conservancy's conservation, science and green living blogs.

RSS Feed unavailable
More Blogs »
RSS Feed  ShareThis
Join The Nature Conservancy on:
  • Find us on Facebook
  • Flickr
  • Twitter